Skybergoth

Skybergoth is a replacement dwelling for a redundant substandard 1930 dormer bungalow. The brief was to design a low impact, energy efficient building that would maximize views over Coverack beach and harbour.The challenge was to design something that would fit in with the mix of vernacular and contemporary architecture and blend in with the contours of the land.

The energy efficiency and functionality of the final project is paramount to the client and an iterative design process has been taken. Mid way through this process we decided to design the house to “Passivhaus” standard, a German design philosophy which maximizes insulation in the building fabric, eliminates thermal bridges, creates an airtight structure, maximizes winter solar gain and allows the house temperature to be controlled via mechanical ventilation with heat recovery.

This presented the challenge of designing a building with views to the northeast yet trying to maximize winter solar gain to the south where the ground rose away steeply.

The project has gone through many iterations and has been extensively modeled in Passivhaus planning package PHPP both by our selves and with additional consultation from WARM: low energy building practice.

Due to the orientation restrictions of the site and construction methods required for such an inaccessible site the project has just missed out on Passivhaus Certification with a specific space heat demand of just 15kWh/(m2a) needed to pass, Skybergoth modeled at 17kWh/(m2a). This is still a fantastic result compared to a typical family house in the UK having a specific space heat demand of just 120kWh/(m2a) and one we are all very proud of.

A pre completion air test value of 0.5, we understand, is the best air tightness result recorded by SW Air Energy to date. Skybergoth is now nearing completion and we wait in great anticipation of the final results.
This presented the challenge of designing a building with views to the northeast yet trying to maximize winter solar gain to the south where the ground rose away steeply.

 

The project has gone through many iterations and has been extensively modeled in Passivhaus planning package PHPP both by our selves and with additional consultation from WARM: low energy building practice.

 

Due to the orientation restrictions of the site and construction methods required for such an inaccessible site the project has just missed out on Passivhaus Certification with a specific space heat demand of just 15kWh/(m2a) needed to pass, Skybergoth modeled at 17kWh/(m2a). This is still a fantastic result compared to a typical family house in the UK having a specific space heat demand of just 120kWh/(m2a) and one we are all very proud of.

Skybergoth is at the final design stage and work on site should commence in mid 2011.